Gill Andrews

Gill Andrews

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Gill Andrews

Gill Andrews

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Richard Briant

Richard Briant

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Richard is an Associate Fellow at the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. His current projects include programmes for mid-career Indian professionals and the Archbishop Tutu Leadership Fellowship Programme.

Richard has worked at Oxford University for over 20 years both at the Business School and before that as the administrator of the Department of Materials where he helped set up the University’s Science Park at Begbroke. His early professional experience was as a UK civil servant and diplomat. He has also worked in the water industry as an economic consultant and specialist journalist. Richard is an active Friend (and former Chair of Friends) of the Pitt Rivers Museum. Richard brings to OA broad experience as a Trustee as well as familiarity with practical management in tight financial circumstances.

Paul Chadwick

Paul Chadwick

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Paul joined the Trustees in 2020, having retired from a career in professional archaeology. A graduate from the University of Wales (University College Cardiff), after a stint on the digging circuit in the mid-1970s, Paul went into local government, first in North Yorkshire, where he created the Sites & Monuments Record for England’s largest county, and then in Berkshire, where he also developed innovative planning policies that helped form a basis for government planning policy in PPG16. Since 1991 he has worked in archaeological planning consultancy and was a founding director of CgMs Consulting. Since retiring, Paul has undertaken a study of Roman agricultural landscapes in the Midlands and southern England and is currently preparing a D.Phil thesis at the University of Oxford on Romano-British rural settlement and farming.

Chris Gosden

Chris Gosden

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Chair of Trustees

Chris is Chair of European Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford. His research interests include anthropology and archaeology, archaeology and colonialism, archaeology and intelligence, Iron Age Britain, Turkmenistan, and Papua New Guinea. He is currently excavating the site of Marcham (with Gary Lock) – a late Iron and Romano-British site with large religious structures which throws light on ritual and belief before and during the Romano-British period. He is co-director (with Mike O’Hanlon) of the Relational Museum Project examining the sets of connections between people and objects which make up the Pitt Rivers Museum. He is also working on a book on archaeology and intelligence.

Helena Hamerow

Helena Hamerow

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Helena Hamerow is Professor of Early Medieval Archaeology and formerly Head of the School of Archaeology at Oxford University. After a BA in Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, she undertook a DPhil at Oxford which led first to a Lectureship at Durham University, and then back to Oxford in 1996.

She has a particular interest in the Anglo-Saxon period and how the emergence of kingship and religious communities, as well as the development of formal markets in the 7th to 9th centuries, affected daily life and modes of production.

Helena has written on the settlement archaeology of the North Sea Zone from the period 400-900, and is interested in broad trends in settlement across this region. She also maintains a strong interest in the Upper Thames Valley during the Anglo-Saxon period, and has been involved in several joint projects with OA, notably at Sutton Courtenay and Dorchester-on-Thames.

Jan Wills

Jan Wills

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